Monday, May 25, 2020

Human Rights, By John Wyndham - 1589 Words

There really is no true or perfect human image yet society these days expects people to look and act a certain way and people can be very cruel if a person does not meet these expectations. In the novel The Chrysalids written by John Wyndham and in reality presently, many human rights are violated and these rights will continue to be violated as long as humans exist and people continue to be cruel. In the town of Waknuk, certain people do not follow the human rights but instead they violate them. Throughout the novel, many characters rights are being violated such as the abuse and torture David faces, the intolerance towards woman like Sophie and Petra for being different. Throughout the novel, David, the protagonist is abused and tortured several times by his very own father, Joseph Strorm and his recently discovered Uncle, Gordon. David’s father is a strict believer in his religion and is unyielding on the subject of mutations and blasphemy’s. If anyone neglects to fo llow his beliefs and rules, he has serious consequences for them, like with David, once Joseph found out that David knows a blasphemy, he immediately subjected to abusing him for answers. David’s father continues to beat him until he receives the information he demands. David has been abused more than once by his father and this is evident when David says, â€Å"I knew well enough what that meant, but I knew well too, that with my father in his present mood, it would happened whether I told or not. I set my jaw,Show MoreRelatedHuman Rights Violations By John Wyndham1534 Words   |  7 Pages Human Rights Violations in The Chrysalids There are some rights that every human in this world is entitled to. These are called human rights and they define how a human should be treated, so that everyone is treated equally and no one is discriminated, or treated unfairly . Violations of these these rights include torture, slavery, discrimination and restriction of freedom, these are only some of the many violations. In today s world many people are discriminated and have their human rights violatedRead MoreHow Love Survived Admist Suffering in John Wydhams The Chrysalids1210 Words   |  5 PagesAmidst all the pain in John Wyndham’s The Chrysalids, there is love. This powerful human emotion has survived in the oppressing society of Waknuk. Wyndham portrays love among hardships to remind us that there is always hope for humanity, despite obstacles it may encounter. Through the Wenders’ sacrificial, unresentful devotion to their mutant daughter, through David’s discovery of reassurance and affection in his uncle amidst fear and uncertainty, and through the telepaths’ undying love for oneRead MoreThe, By John Wyndham1313 Words   |  6 PagesThe Chrysalids Essay â€Å"A man that puts himself on the ground of moral principle, if the whole world be against him, is mightier than all of them.† Morality is a major theme in John Wyndham’s novel The Chrysalids, but with morality, there is no definitive right and wrong. Human beings, seen as the most intelligent life force, like to believe that morals are easily determined, but that is far from the truth. To act in juxtaposition, to perform acts that the world would deem immoral, requires a certainRead MoreEssay about The Chrysalids - Discrimination827 Words   |  4 Pages‘The Chrysalids’ by John Wyndham is about an innocent boy with telepathic abilities living in an anti-mutant society. This boy, David, faces several challenges which made him realise of the ways of the world he is in. The main theme of the novel is discrimination and it can be seen from the society of Waknuk, Joseph Strorm and the setting of the book. The society of Waknuk is taught to follow the laws of God and the ’Definition of Man’ for they fear the punishment that they will receive if theyRead MoreThe Evil And Oppression Of The Innocent By John Wyndham1208 Words   |  5 PagesThe False Perfection The novel, The Chrysalids by John Wyndham, foretells of a futuristic story which unfolds about injustice and oppression of the innocent. In a dystopian world a group of eight telepathic children struggle to grow up undiscovered and when the time comes, to escape. A religious creed is set up â€Å"The Definition of Man† as a ‘purity standard’. As a result, people lived with much fear and self-hatred. The standard set one neighbour against the other in fear of another ‘tribulation’Read MoreThe Chrysalids, by John Wyndham 1153 Words   |  5 Pagesâ€Å"The Chrysalids† by John Wyndham is a science fiction novel about a town that does not accept difference. The novel takes place in a post nuclear time in the community of Waknuk. It describes how human nature can be cruel and the act of acceptance which everyone strives for. David Strorm morally and emotionally grows throughout the novel through character, setting, theme and plot. Significant even ts that David experiences teach him both something about himself and the world he lives in. When he firstlyRead MoreDangers Of Being Different Than The Social Norm Through Symbolism, Diction And Conflict1345 Words   |  6 Pageshave to immerse yourself in the right group, in the group that can enhance your abilities. However, in The Chrysalids by John Wyndham, David is deprived of the opportunity â€Å"to fly with the eagles†. The society he is living in forbids him to be any different than the ‘written’ norm. The public’s strict mannerisms peak David’s curiosity. He discovers that if an individual is different than the rest they must suffer severe consequences. Hence, The Chrysalids by John Wyndham demonstrates the dangers of beingRead MoreThe Chrysalids by John Wyndham Essay906 Words   |  4 Pages The Chrysalids, by John Wyndham is a great novel in my opinion. It occurs in the future but it focuses on prejudices, intolerance and torture, issues that exist now and will always exist as long as we do. I believe the novel has a very important message for readers today. In the novel, The Chrysalids, and in reality presently, many human rights are being violated. First off, child abuse and torture is a major factor in the novel. Secondly, the intolerance towards the women of Waknuk, and howRead MoreEssay Aspects of control in The Handmaids Tale and The Chrysalids2467 Words   |  10 PagesAspects of control in The Handmaids Tale and The Chrysalids Margaret Atwood and John Wyndham both write of distopian societies within the science-fiction genre to explore the varying ways in which society can abuse authority in order to gain control. This violent and dehumanising repression is used to create vulnerability and fear among the society as a method of control. The writers use the narrators Offred and David to explore the response to oppression and bothRead MoreDiscrimination in The Chrysalids by John Wyndam Essay796 Words   |  4 PagesThroughout time, readers have learned many different lessons from their favourite books. In The Chrysalids, John Wyndam used his story to teach his readers valuable, lifelong lessons. He makes it evident to his readers that prejudging certain people is not right. Also, he relates how change is possible, but hard to achieve. More specifically, religion often influences one’s point of view. John Wyndam’s, The Chrysalids was written with a purpose that teaches his readers about discrimination, about how

Thursday, May 14, 2020

Analysis Of The Story Everyday Use - 872 Words

In â€Å"Everyday Use† there is a dilemma, taking place between a mother and her two daughters. As the story progresses we tend to see how the mother acknowledges the extreme differences between her daughter’s character traits and overall personalities. Even with understanding that one daughter is completely different from the other, mama, strategically is able to display love and compassion for both. However, by the end of the story, mama makes a drastic decision to favor one, due to the overly aggressive demands and disrespects from one daughter to another, regarding the most valuable items in mama’s home. As a result, mama stood firm in her decision, realizing that Dee had gone through a mindset change ever since she left the house and rudely imposing her new believes on the family. As the expected reunion with her oldest daughter, Dee, took place, but yet surprising event; mama proceeds to kindly welcome her daughter and her new partner for a classic southern meal of collards and pork complimented by corn bread. During dinner, Dee or Wangero as she is referred to in this point of the story, excitedly erupts and starts to describe some of the wood crafting items in the kitchen; to include the dining bench they are sitting on. Detailing how the rump prints felt, and as if it really mattered to her, she mentioned how her â€Å"daddy made [benches] for the table when we couldn’t afford chairs.† (Walker 74) As she gazed through the kitchen, she turned to the wooden churn in theShow MoreRelatedAnalysis Of The Story Everyday Use 1216 Words   |  5 Pagesâ€Å"Everyday Use† From the beginning, the story is being told from the point of view of the mother. She introduces her two daughters, Dee and Maggie. She starts by comparing how much smarter Dee is compared to maggie and herself: She used to read to us without pity; forcing words, lies, other folks habits, whole lives upon us two, sitting trapped and ignorant underneath her voice. She washed us in a river of make believe, burned us with a lot of knowledge we didn t necessarily need to know. PressedRead More(A Critical Analysis of Alice Walker’s short story Everyday Use)700 Words   |  3 PagesAntojos de Mis Ojos (A Critical Analysis of Alice Walker’s short story Everyday Use) Albert Camus once asserted: â€Å"Men are never convinced of your reasons, of your sincerity, of the seriousness of your sufferings, except by your death. So long as you are alive, your case is doubtful; you have a right only to their skepticism.† In Everyday Use a strong willed mother tries to protect her younger daughter, Maggie, from having a quilt passed down for generations stolen from her by her materialisticRead MoreAn Analysis Of Kate Chopin s The Story Of An Hour And Everyday Use 795 Words   |  4 PagesTia Howard Professor Dr. Prince-leaf English 28 November 2016 Identity In the stories â€Å" The Story Of an Hour† by Kate Chopin and â€Å"Everyday Use† by Alice Walker; The two main character’s, Louise Mallard and Dee Johnson, live in a world faced with a challenge of questioning on the life they have been accustomed to for years. Furthermore, this causes one to feel oppressed, and the other one to feel they have to live a different life in order to feel fulfilled. Ultimately, not being able to feel fulfilledRead MoreSame Theme, Different Development in of Virginia Woolf and Alice Walker’s The Legacy and Everyday Use690 Words   |  3 PagesWoolf and Alice Walker’s The Legacy and Everyday Use, both of them have the common that is the theme of the story carries â€Å"the heritage† issue but the focus of it is different. In The Legacy, the focus of the heritage was a relic diary of Angela for her husband. Implicitly, we can conclude that the heritage was meant to be recognition of Angela to her husband. While the focus in Everyday Use, the focus of the heritage was the quilts, and in the final story we could see the truth meaning of heritageRead More Analysis of Patches: Quilt and Community in Alice Walkers Everyday Use693 Words   |  3 PagesAnalysis of Patches: Quilt and Community in Alice Walkers Everyday Use In a critique titled â€Å"Patches: Quilt and Community in Alice Walker’s ‘Everyday Use’† (Short Story Criticism: Excerpts from Criticism of the Works of Short Fiction Writers, 1990), the authors reveal that tradition and the explanation of holiness were key elements throughout the story. The writers began the analysis by discussing the significance of a quilt; a quilt is a complete piece of artwork that is essentially madeRead MoreAnalysis Of Walker s Everyday Use863 Words   |  4 PagesAnalysis of Walker’s â€Å"Everyday Use† The short story â€Å"Everyday Use,† by Alice Walker, contains multiple different literary elements. History and heritage play a key role in the development and conclusion of this rather intriguing story. Although history and heritage are important, the driving factors of this story are the literary elements. In particular the elements of symbols, characterization, and point of view in this story are significant. The use of symbols in this short story provide a deeperRead MoreEssay on The Importance of Heritage in Everyday Use829 Words   |  4 PagesIn â€Å"Everyday Use † by Alice Walker the exact setting is never revealed and therefore, can only be guessed, but it has been guessed that the story takes place on a country side in Georgia. At one point in the story Augusta is mentioned. The time is also estimated to be during the Civil Rights Movement around the year of 1973. Mrs. Johnson, along with her two daughters, reside in a small three room house, and take pride in there small yard. As Maggie and Dee grow older they start to realize howRead MoreLiterary Analysis Of Everyday Use By Alice Walker1083 Words   |  5 PagesUse (Literary analysis on Everyday Use by Alice Walker) Everyday many people use the same things such as phones, cars, sinks, washer, refrigerators, and etc. In 100 years would you can future ancestors still have those things but only use them as decoration or use them still no matter how old they are because that is what they are made for? Everyday Use by Alice walker is a story of an African American family that had two daughter that live a very different reality. Maggie being scarred from aRead MoreAnalysis Of The Flowers, By Alice Walker1525 Words   |  7 PagesAlice Walker grew up. She has written stories about her life, and stories that have had an impact on her life based on how she grew up. The two short stories The Flowers and Everyday Use have a common theme of feeling comfortable, safe, and at peace when one is home. Walker uses diction, syntax, and characterization to develop this common theme in her writing. A house is a safe comfortable place where one can feel at peace and in The Flowers and Everyday Use, the author Alice Walker develops theRead MoreEssay on A Psychological Analysis of Alice Walkers Everyday Use883 Words   |  4 PagesA Psychological Analysis of Alice Walkers Everyday Use  Ã‚     Ã‚   The human mind is divided into three parts that make up the mind as a whole. These parts are necessary to have a complete mind, just as the members of a family are needed to make up the entire family. The use of components to equal a whole is often exercised in literature. Alice Walkers short story, Everyday Use, contains the idea of family and of the mind, therefore her work can be evaluated through psychological methods. Through

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Examples Of Colonialism In The Tempest - 944 Words

The Tempest, written by playwright William Shakespeare is one of his most popular, yet also controversial plays. This paper will discuss the postcolonial interpretations of Shakespeare’s play, by looking at the nature of colonialism, and how it has been incorporated within his play, through the role of the colonized versus the colonizers. This paper will also compare how 21st century audience’s views may differ to that of the traditional Elizabethan’s, in relation to the play’s treatment of the original inhabitants of the island. Written between the years of 1610 and 1611, The Tempest is thought by many critics to be one of the last pays Shakespeare wrote independently. Full of magic, deceit, and conspiracies, The Tempest is one of†¦show more content†¦As stated by Deborah Willis in her article Shakespeares Tempest and the Discourse of Colonialism, â€Å"Prospero dominates this play in a way few Shakespearean characters do in others† (279), though with that being said the play does not favor him nor does it endorse his treatment and abuse of the Islands natives, but simply accepts it as is. Prospero does this through his overall power seen continually throughout the play, and it is this idea of power that divides the colonizer from the colonized or in this case Prospero from Caliban and Ariel. Furthermore, an example of this abused use of power can be seen in act 1 scene 2, when Prospero reminds Ariel of the kindness he has shown, â€Å"Dost thou forget/From what a torment I did free thee?â⠂¬  (1.2.299-300) in saying this Prospero reminds Ariel that he owes his freedom to Prospero and therefore his servitude. Furthermore, the relationship struggle for dominance between Prospero and Caliban is highly apparent in Act 3 Scene 2, when Caliban the original ruler of the island, explains that Prospero is an intruder and has betrayed his trust and initial welcome by enslaving him, in order to rule the Island himself, â€Å"I say by sorcery he got this isle;/From me he got it. If thy greatness will, /Revenge it on him, for I know thou darst,/But this thing dare not.† (3.2.59-62). Even though Caliban is hailed as the original ruler of the Island throughout the entire play, after his mother’s entrapment, as seen in act 1 scene 2Show MoreRelated The Theme of Colonialism in Shakespeares Tempest Essay example2636 Words   |  11 Pages The Tempest, by Shakespeare, offers the reader a variety of themes. The one theme that stands out the most is that of colonialism. During the time of Shakespeare, many European countries such as Spain, France, and England, were expanding their borders by taking over less developed countries, referred to as colonies. During this time of exploitation, there was skepticism concerning the possible success of the colonies. While some scholars believe that the play is about the Americas, I argue thatRead More Aime Cesaires A Tempest Clarifies Shakespeares The Tempest1683 Words   |  7 PagesCesaires A Tempest Clarifies Shakespeares The Tempest      Ã‚  Ã‚   Negritude, originally a literary and ideological movement of French-speaking black intellectuals, reflects an important and comprehensive reaction to the colonial situation of European colonization (Carlberg).   This movement, which influenced Africans as well as blacks around the world, specifically rejects the political, social, and moral domination of the West.  Ã‚   Leopold Senghor, Leon Damas, and Aime Cesaire are the three pioneersRead MoreThe Postcolonial Interpretations Of Shakespeares The Tempest1512 Words   |  7 Pages The Tempest, written by playwright William Shakespeare is one of his most popular, yet also controversial plays. This paper will discuss the postcolonial interpretations of Shakespeare’s play, by looking at the nature of colonialism, and how it has been incorporated within his play, through the role of the colonized versus the colonizers. This paper will also compare how 21st century audience’s views may differ to that of the traditional Elizabethan’s, in relation to the play’s treatment of theRead MoreEssay On Colonialism In The Tempest1624 Words   |  7 Pagesfinal play, The Tempest, holds phenomenal value. In his writing, Shakespeare often included contemporary issues of his time. In Hamlet, for example, the idea of a King dying was an important notion. This was drawn from the belief that a King got his authority from God, so if he died nature would become unbalanced and disturbed. In The Tempest, he included his supportive views of colonialism into his writing. Centuries later, Aimà © Cà ©saire made an adaptation of Shakespeare’s The Tempest, to create aRead MoreThings Fall Apart By Chinua Achebe And William Shakespeare s The Tempest1417 Words   |  6 PagesRoughly based on personal encounters Joseph Conrad uses Heart of Darkness to comment on the negative aspects of colonialism. Colonialism by definition is, â€Å"the policy and practice of a power in extending control over weaker peoples or areas.† In the novel Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe and William Shakespeare’s play The Tempest, colonialism plays a significant role in the break down of humans. The conquerors in both stories disregard the natives believing that they are working towards the greaterRead More European Colonization in Shakespeares The Tempest Essay1279 Words   |  6 PagesNo Critique of European Colonization in The Tempest      Since the 1960s, several critics have found a critique of colonialism in their respective readings of Shakespeares The Tempest. The most radical of these analyses takes Prospero to be a European invader of the magical but primitive land that he comes to rule, using his superior knowledge to enslave its original inhabitants, most notably Caliban, and forcing them to do his bidding. While the textual clues concerning the geographic locationRead MoreWilliam Shakespeare s The Tempest1267 Words   |  6 Pagesand whimsy, incorporating both fiction and nonfiction elements. One trademark of Shakespeare s plays were the subtle allusions to the concurrent events in the English government. This is evident in his well known and final play, The Tempest. The story of The Tempest tells the tale of Prospero, a fallen duke forced to live on a desolate island in exile. He intends to regain his dukedom and seek revenge upon those who wronged him. During his time on the island, Prospero masters the po wer of illusionRead MoreThe Tempest vs. European Colonialism961 Words   |  4 Pages Colonialism is an appropriate modem for understanding the Tempest by William Shakespeare because there are many correspondences between the European-African relationship and the American-African relationship. Similar to the American-African relationship where the Europeans are the colonizers and the slaves are the colonized, the European-African relationship has Prospero as the colonizer and Caliban as the colonized. Caliban holds up the colonialist interpretation of the Tempest partly throughRead MoreWorld Events Influencing Shakespeare ¨s The Tempest Essay example1277 Words   |  6 Pagesthe â€Å"golden age† of poetry, music and literature. It was in the midst of European exploration that Shakespeare wrote, The Tempest. It would be safe to suggest that many of the worldly events during this time, such as the shipwreck of Sea Venture, global colonization, and the works of Michel de Montaigne, had prodigious influences on Shakespeare’s play, The Tempest. The Tempest starts aboard a ship in the middle of the sea caught in a violent hurricane. Members of the audience can hear Gonzola shoutRead MoreProsperos Relationship with Caliban and Colonialism in The Tempest1483 Words   |  6 Pagesdemonstration of the dependence relationship between a coloniser and the native of whichever colony he set his eye upon. Colonialism was a subject easily related to by Shakespeares contemporary audience; with James on the throne the British Empire was beginning to thrive and would soon become the largest in not only the 17th Century world, but one of the largest in history. At the time The Tempest was first preformed, 1611, Britain had begun to lay claim to North America and the smaller Caribbean isles, a

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Relationship Between Obstetrical Work and Outcomes

Question: Discuss about the Relationship Between Obstetrical Work and Outcomes. Answer: Introduction: The case study projects the practice of midwifery in nursing cases. Care from registered nurses results in the achievement of positive outcomes (Wickramasinghe, 2012). The midwife in the case study recommended Jane the tests that she needs for normal delivery. The prolonged nature of the tests acts as a compromise with the healthcare of Jane. Long duration in case of the provision of healthcare might aggravate the complexities of Jane in terms of her pregnancy. The collection of the Janes blood sample and recommendation for genetic test, as per the policy norms reflects the struggle of the hospital staffs towards ensuring the wellbeing of service users like Jane (Melo et al., 2016). Along with this, the ten-page long survey questionnaire form acts as a cornerstone for the hospital staffs in mitigating the potential risk factors that might act as an obstacle in Janes pregnancy (Scholl Olaniran, 2015). Making Jane wait for a prolonged period after registration can be considered as a deviation in terms of the providing immediate services to the service users. Spontaneity is lacking in this case, which is a kind of negligence by the hospital staffs towards the efficient exposure of the allocated roles and responsibilities. Improvement towards the patient care As per the arguments of Sadler et al., (2013), speculation of the intensity of Janes tragic predicament, results in the establishment of the fact that spontaneous initiatives needs to be taken for gifting Jane a normal delivery. One of such recommendation is Information and Communication Technologies (ICT). Effective utilization of this technology would provide the patients, such as, Jane with a modern care. The parameter of communication in the technology is the medium, which enhances the stability between the relationship between the patients and the hospital staffs (Currie, 2014). The features of ICT are so advanced that it assists the hospital staffs to store the personal records of the patients. Herein, the performance exposed by the hospital staffs, towards Jane, acts as a deviation. Effective and judicious utilization of ICT software would have eased out the process of collecting the blood sample and retrieving it as per the requirements (Currie, 2014). Along with this, ICT would have added to the relaxation of Jane in terms of completing the hospital formalities. However, compelling Jane to complete the long survey form aggravates Janes pregnancy complications. On the contrary, putting the survey form on the website of the hospital would have added to Janes comfort, which is crucial for a normal delivery (Wang Kim, 2015). Effectiveness of the changes According to the viewpoints of Mejdoubi et al., (2014), the recent scenario of healthcare necessitates the importance of ICT. The first parameter is information. Putting all the information on the website portal would help the administrative authorities of the hospital in connecting with several numbers of people at a single time. This type of connection on a large-scale would escalate the sales revenue of the hospital, which would add maximum value to the profit margin (Hollis et al., 2015). These benefits contradict the severity of Janes case, which degrades the managerial duties and responsibilities towards the care of the patients. Viewing it from the perspectives of the patients, this technology would add a modern touch into their lifestyles. As a matter of specification, ICT would safeguard their personal data and belongings. Moreover, provision of contacting the doctors online reduces the endless waits for the patients like Jane in terms of getting quality treatments and care (Watson et al., 2016). Joint ventures with the stakeholders and shareholders would result in the introduction to prospective deals, trades and transactions for the wellbeing of patients like Jane (Wickramasinghe, 2012). Putting these offers, schemes and discounts on the website portal would increase the trafficking of the audience towards the hospital, which would act as a promotional activity for enhancing the reputation. One of the major benefits of ICT is that it exposes the patients to a number of sources, from where they can get quality recommendations, support, treatment and care (Lindberg et al., 2013). The provision of video conferencing with the healthcare professionals assists the patients to get solutions for their health related problems by sitting at their homes. This facility proves beneficial for Jane in respect to avert the pregnancy related complications. This highlights the parameter of communication, which enhances the corporate social responsibility of the hospital in terms of ensuring the wellbeing of the patients. Challenges towards the achievement of success According to (Wickramasinghe, 2012), pregnancy during employment is one of the greatest challenges for women. Paying attention equally to the household chores as well as work pressure destroys the balance in their life. Jane underwent the same predicament, evidence of which, is her not letting her boos know about her appointment with the general physician. Double confirmation about pregnancy aggravates the complexities for Jane. On the contrary, direct consultation with the general physician would have smoothened the treatment process. The second urine test puts pressure on her womb, which might not bestow the joy of a normal delivery on Jane (Scholl Olaniran, 2015). This issue necessitates the technologically advanced machines, which possesses flexibility to detect pregnancy through one scan. Jane has already conducted the test, therefore execution of the test the second time does not seem justified. One of the other challenges is the numerous times Jane has to register for getting treatment. Considering her issue, she needs to be provided utmost comfort and rest, which seemed to be lacking in the case study. Registration needs mental preparation, which lacks maturation in the initial phases of pregnancy (Wallis, 2012). Maintaining continuity with the challenges, the much-needed rest contradicts the numerous times Jane is ordered to visit the hospital for treatment. Countering this, visiting the hospital ensures Jane of whether all the processes are on the right track or not; however, in this process, she is deprived of the rest that she needs for having a normal delivery. In order to avert all these issues, technologically advanced machines are needed so that these kinds of tests can be conducted online (Wang Kim, 2015).This means smoothens out the potential challenges, which might act as an obstacle in normal childbirth. Cyber crimes might aggravate the potential risk factors for the patients as well as the hospital staffs. Lack of possession of efficient and technologically advanced machines overpowers the hackers in terms of intervening into the personal data and information of the patients (Lindberg et al., 2013).Typical example in this direction is Quick Heal Security, which assists the hospital staffs to mitigate the virus attacks within the online activities. Lack of knowledge regarding the utilization of technologically advanced devices might aggravate the complexities of the hospital staffs in terms of providing quality healthcare services to patients like Jane. This drawback might degrade the health issues of the patients in times of emergencies (Yang et al., 2014). In order to overcome these challenges, training acts as a beneficial means. Training would enhance the preconceived skills, expertise and knowledge of the employees (Wallis, 2012). This enrichment would act as a savior for the healthcare professionals in terms of ensuring the wellbeing of the patients, suffering from the same plight as that of Jane. Provision of training to the employees on the effective utilization of the technologically advanced machines would help the management authorities to achieve technological advancement. Along with this, trainings would act as a savior for the staffs to handle the emergency situations effectively, which would improve the quality of lifestyle for the patients. Adoption of feedback, survey and customer portals would help the hospital authorities to bring noticeable improvements in their services, which would simultaneously upgrade their status on the humanitarian grounds (Yang et al., 2014). References Currie, W. L. (2014). Translating Health IT Policy into Practice in the UK NHS.Scandinavian Journal of Information Systems,26(2), 3-26. Hollis, C., Morriss, R., Martin, J., Amani, S., Cotton, R., Denis, M., Lewis, S. (2015). Technological innovations in mental healthcare: harnessing the digital revolution.The British Journal of Psychiatry,206(4), 263-265. Lindberg, B., Nilsson, C., Zotterman, D., Sderberg, S., Skr, L. (2013). Using information and communication technology in home care for communication between patients, family members, and healthcare professionals: a systematic review.International journal of telemedicine and applications,2013. Mejdoubi, J., van den Heijkant, S. C., van Leerdam, F. J., Crone, M., Crijnen, A., HiraSing, R. A. (2014). Effects of nurse home visitation on cigarette smoking, pregnancy outcomes and breastfeeding: a randomized controlled trial.Midwifery,30(6), 688-695. Melo, M. N., Amorim, T. V., Salimena, A. M. D. O., Melo, M. C. S. C. D., Souza, . E. D. O. (2016). Hospital care of women that experienced a high risk pregnancy: contributions to nursing.Journal of Nursing UFPE on line,10(11), 3911-3917. Sadler, L. S., Slade, A., Close, N., Webb, D. L., Simpson, T., Fennie, K., Mayes, L. C. (2013). Minding the baby: Enhancing reflectiveness to improve early health and relationship outcomes in an interdisciplinary home?visiting program.Infant mental health journal,34(5), 391-405. Scholl, J. C., Olaniran, B. A. (2015). ICT use and multidisciplinary healthcare teams. InHealthcare Administration: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications(pp. 886-904). IGI Global. Wallis, A. (2012). Survey explores nurses use of e-health tools: Electronic records enable information to be shared with colleagues and patients, but staff need to understand the benefits of computer technology. Alison Wallis gauges clinicians awareness of e-developments and their computer literacy skills.Nursing Management,18(10), 14-19. Wang, H. J., Kim, I. O. (2015). Effects of a mobile web-based pregnancy health care educational program for mothers at an advanced maternal age.Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing,45(3), 337-346. Watson, J., Nicholson, M., Dobbin, K., Fleming, K., Alleyne, J. M. (2016). Exploring the Relationship between Obstetrical Nurses Work and Pregnancy Outcomes.Open Journal of Nursing,6(09), 812. Wickramasinghe, N. (2012). Healthcare Delivery in the Information Age. Yang, H. J., Kao, F. Y., Chou, Y. J., Huang, N., Chang, K. Y., Chien, L. Y. (2014). Do Nurses Have Worse Pregnancy Outcomes Than Non?Nurses?.Birth,41(3), 262-267.

Monday, April 6, 2020

Analysis of Barbie Doll free essay sample

The Devastation of Social Pressure One would think that growing up would be a fun, not a worry in the world, happy experience. Yes, that is the way it should be, but that’s not always the case, especially for women. As girls season into women they realize they not only have to face the fact that they’re in a patriarchal society, but also the influences and pressure they face in the social aspect of things, such as their looks and body image. There is so much competition amongst girls, especially when transitioning into a woman and through most of their adulthood. So instead of being able to enjoy life and absorbing the true quality of it, we are side tracked with superficial, stereotypical, shallow thoughts and images of how we think life is supposed to be. Although, who’s to say what’s right and what’s wrong with the way we interpret things? Marge Piercy, who wrote the poem â€Å"Barbie Doll†, has a very strong view of how destructive social pressure can be to a girl through her transitioning stages into a woman. We will write a custom essay sample on Analysis of Barbie Doll or any similar topic specifically for you Do Not WasteYour Time HIRE WRITER Only 13.90 / page She expresses how the Barbie doll, the toy figurine that woman idealize, is, in fact, a method of corruption to a young girl. First and for most we must understand who the persona is in the poem, which is a woman, and more specifically Marge Piercy herself. She is observing a young girl going from Wolfe 2 childhood, adolescents, adulthood and then death in a roundabout way. Starting with the first stanza, of four, the persona explains of a young girl, and her playing with a doll, the Mattel’s Barbie doll to be precise. This doll is to be described as tall, blonde hair, blue eyes and it has the perfect body. The girl, â€Å"†¦presented dolls that pee-pee/and miniature GE stoves and irons/ and wee lipsticks the color of cherry candy† (2-4). The words iron, stove, and lipstick are all play-things for the girl, but are also identity markers. Such that the doll represents the ideal body image, the iron and stove tells us what type of work is expected of the girl when she becomes an adult (keep in mind that this poem was written in the nineteen seventies and that woman in the work force was still a very small percentage, thus women were still very domesticated) and the lipstick is to imply a sexual innuendo. In the last line in the first stanza the girl goes through puberty and no time is wasted before a classmate judges and criticizes her, â€Å"You have a great big nose and fat legs† (6). Going through puberty is a stage of growth. Adolescents become more aware of their social standing and sexual being. As we read further, the doll, she once played with, will create a major impact on her; in the aspect of her body image and the pressure she faces from her peers. In the second stanza we see how the woman is dissatisfied with herself even though she is â€Å"healthy and tested intelligent/possessed strong arms and back/ abundant sexual drive and manual dexterity† (7-9). The persona continues to say, â€Å"She went to and fro apologizing/Everyone saw a fat nose on thick legs† (10-11). The traits that this woman possesses, is in every way correct; however, she is so sure her physical traits are unacceptable to the culture. No matter what she sees in the mirror or what she hears, this won’t change her opinion about herself image. She has been brainwashed about her looks and she doesn’t think she is good enough. She goes around apologizing to everyone about the person she has become, believing there is no way she can change, at least in a healthy manner. In the third stanza we read how society is forcing the woman to change her healthy ways, physically, into something she isn’t. She does what she can to fit into society by, â€Å"†¦play[ing] coy/ exhorted to come on hearty/ exercise, diet, smile and wheedle† (12-14). She had so much pressure from every direction, she felt obligated to try and conform her body into what society viewed as ideal, which we know of as the Barbie doll toy. This idea was short lived. Instead of standing her grounds and accepting the individual that she is, she drowns. Society got the best of her, â€Å"Her good nature wore out/ like a fan belt† (15-16). She gave up and paid the ultimate price to be accepted in society, â€Å"†¦she cut off her nose and her legs/ and offered them up† (17-18). Now that she has removed her flaws she temporarily relinquishes her depression, weakness, and anxiety. Now that she has met the, impossible, unrealistic, standard, she can permanently wash her existences away and leave her shell of beauty behind. In the final Stanza, Piercy highlights the theme of the poem. Simply put, women aren’t accepted into society unless they represent the ideal woman. Now that the woman is free of body flaws and has had a makeover, she can be accepted into her culture even though we know this isn’t her true self. What must this say about the society she has been exposed to? In order to survive in this specific culture, if we’re not perfect, is to become someone we’re not. So not only do we have to try to live up to a standard that is not comprehendible but we also have to be fake. In the middle of the last stanza Piercy explains, â€Å"with the undertaker’s cosmetics painted on/a turned-up putty nose/dressed in a pink and white nightie† (20-22). The woman now has the superficial , but perfect, looks. She is manipulated (physically) so she can finally be recognized. Letting a society make this woman frail and surrender to being her own individual shows a lack of values and morals within herself. Having our own opinions, life experiences and ethics make us who we are and if we were all the same or are held up to the same expectations what would life be like? Would we all act like robots? Clones? As the woman has been re-configured, shallow talks are amongst her, â€Å"Doesn’t she look pretty? everyone said/Consummation at last/To every woman a happy ending† (23-25). Mission complete, she achieved her goal; she is pretty, unflawed, and looks like the ideal woman.

Monday, March 9, 2020

Free Essays on Free Speech and Internet

Internet: An Unrestricted Global Media Should it be illegal to publish literature with "indecent" content on the Internet but perfectly legal to publish that same work in print? This question has spawned the debate over Internet censorship, which is currently raging in the United States Congress as well as in other political forums around the world. The question as to whether the Internet should be censored will continue to be debated for many years to come. As with any political topic, the debate over Internet censorship has its extremes. Many proponents of Internet censorship want strict control over this new information medium. These proponents suggest creating laws for the Internet similar to those now in place for television and radio. Those strongly opposing Internet regulations, such as the Citizens Internet Empowerment Coalition (CIEC), assert that the Internet is not like a television and should not be regulated like one. Both sides base their respective arguments on how they view the new information mediu! m. Though the laws that Congress is proposing to regulate the Internet are well intentioned, I strongly believe that the Internet should not be censored. Any law encroaching on the people's right to free speech is an obvious breach of First Amendment rights and because laws limiting Internet speech are too broad and unenforceable on this global medium. Today's youth has the ability to look up a variety of materials on the Internet. One source of heated debate is the availability of bomb recipes on the Internet. Should people be allowed to publish these instructions on such a public forum, or should the government, instead, step in and regulate? Some argue that since the government already censors television and the print media, it should take steps to censor the Internet as well. Censorship is an extremely sensitive issue. It infringes upon the First Amendment rights of an individual. Some people, however, feel that th... Free Essays on Free Speech and Internet Free Essays on Free Speech and Internet Internet: An Unrestricted Global Media Should it be illegal to publish literature with "indecent" content on the Internet but perfectly legal to publish that same work in print? This question has spawned the debate over Internet censorship, which is currently raging in the United States Congress as well as in other political forums around the world. The question as to whether the Internet should be censored will continue to be debated for many years to come. As with any political topic, the debate over Internet censorship has its extremes. Many proponents of Internet censorship want strict control over this new information medium. These proponents suggest creating laws for the Internet similar to those now in place for television and radio. Those strongly opposing Internet regulations, such as the Citizens Internet Empowerment Coalition (CIEC), assert that the Internet is not like a television and should not be regulated like one. Both sides base their respective arguments on how they view the new information mediu! m. Though the laws that Congress is proposing to regulate the Internet are well intentioned, I strongly believe that the Internet should not be censored. Any law encroaching on the people's right to free speech is an obvious breach of First Amendment rights and because laws limiting Internet speech are too broad and unenforceable on this global medium. Today's youth has the ability to look up a variety of materials on the Internet. One source of heated debate is the availability of bomb recipes on the Internet. Should people be allowed to publish these instructions on such a public forum, or should the government, instead, step in and regulate? Some argue that since the government already censors television and the print media, it should take steps to censor the Internet as well. Censorship is an extremely sensitive issue. It infringes upon the First Amendment rights of an individual. Some people, however, feel that th...

Friday, February 21, 2020

Initiative to Engage Employees and Reduce Voluntary Turnover Assignment

Initiative to Engage Employees and Reduce Voluntary Turnover - Assignment Example From this paper it is clear that  as the CEO, ensuring that the employees need for trust is satisfied, can be achieved through enquiring about the needs of the employees. Failing to be aware of the needs of the employees of the company is not a good thing even though it typically happens. This form of mindset should be shifted immediately in order to ensure that the employee issues are understood.As the discussion stresses as the CEO, the author of the report   would come up with mechanism that will provide information of the aspects that are crucial to the employees and since they may not be willing to provide this information directly to the CEOs office, the avenues for this communication should encourage them to provide information. He would make myself available, as a real human being, associate with the employees and show them that I care in order to make communication smoother with the aim of nurturing trust. In order to satisfy the need of the employees to have hope, as th e CEO, he must maintain a positive work setting that will ensure the work environment is conducive and positive for the employees. This is because the work environment is critical to the motivation and happiness of the employees. the reporter would foster hope in the employees by ensuring that they are happy through giving them freedom and eliminating negativity. Therefore, he would ensure that people with bad attitudes are pulled aside and advised on the values they can change in order to increase positivity in the workplace.